Chris Christie removes possible Republican advantage in Senate Race with election decision

This is a blow for the GOP and here is why:

The term for Lautenberg’s vacant seat runs until November 2014. Christie had two options in how to fill it. Option one: Simply appoint someone to serve out the rest of the term and let voters elect a new senator on schedule next year. Assuming Christie appointed a Republican, that would give the national GOP an extra vote in the Senate for almost 18 months — granted, likely a moderate vote, but that’s still preferable to a liberal Democrat. Maybe the appointee would impress Jerseyans with his Senate record and would stand an incumbent’s fighting chance to hold the seat against Cory Booker next year. Or maybe he wouldn’t intend to run against Booker at all, which would free him up to vote as a conservative for the remainder of the term. Jersey Democrats threatened to sue Christie if he went this route, but as Ed Krayewski noted at Reason, he had cover from the state’s bipartisan Office of Legislative Services. Reportedly, they issued an opinion earlier today stating that the 18-month appointment would be just fine legally. Option two: Christie could throw all of that away by appointing a very short-term replacement for Lautenberg and scheduling a special election for sometime later this year. That would give Booker all kinds of advantages. Not only wouldn’t he have to face a GOP incumbent with more than a year’s experience in office, he also wouldn’t need to worry about his opponent having lots of time to fundraise. The risk to Christie in choosing this option was that it would bring all sorts of Democratic voters out to the polls on election day who might otherwise have stayed home. And that means Christie, who’s cruising to victory at the moment, could suddenly see his own gubernatorial reelection bid jeopardized by the big surge in Democratic turnout. All of which makes this a no-brainer, right? Appoint a Republican to finish Lautenberg’s term and trust that Christie’s big lead in the gubernatorial race won’t suffer too much for it. How angry could Jersey Democrats be if he appointed a Republican as squishy as he is? So which option did Christie choose? Option two, of course — except that, in order to protect his own ass electorally, he decided to schedule the Senate special election in October, not on election day in November. Now he gets the best of both worlds, all but handing the seat to Booker ASAP to burnish his “bipartisan” brand while ensuring that he himself doesn’t have to face the extra Democratic voters who’ll turn out to vote for Booker.

“I don’t know what the cost is and I quite frankly don’t care. I don’t think you can put a price tag on what it’s worth it have an elected person in the United States Senate and I will do whatever I need to do to make sure those costs are covered because all the people of the state of New Jersey will benefit from it. And we’re not going to be penny wise and pound foolish around here,” said Christie at a press conference.

Christie of course denys the politics of the play:

“There’s no political purpose. The political purpose is to give the people a voice,” Christie said in announcing his decision today.

But there is political impact.New Jersey will elect a new senator Oct. 16 — a mere 20 days before the state’s gubernatorial election, in which Christie is the undisputed frontrunner for a second term.

That means Christie’s race will top the ballot Nov. 5, instead of a Senate race that could well feature Newark Mayor Cory Booker. The intense interest in the Senate race — in solidly blue New Jersey, in a race that could feature an African-American Democratic rising star — would have almost certainly siphoned votes from Christie.

Democrats are attacking the decision as well:

Democrats teed off on Christie after his announcement at a news conference. The governor’s 2014 Democratic opponent, state Sen. Barbara Buono, called the governor’s move “cynical and arrogant” and said Christie “made it clear that he does not care about wasting taxpayer money.”…

Matt Canter, deputy executive director of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, made that point when responding to the special election dates.

“Republicans have not won a Senate race in New Jersey in more than 40 years. Their only shot was an appointee who had a year-and -a-half to establish themselves before an election in 2014,” he said. “With this news I assume operatives at the NRSC are busy planning Christie’s defeat in Iowa and New Hampshire right now.”

Mia Love assures a conservative bounce-back in 2014, readies to run for Congress again

Saratoga Springs Utah mayor Mia Love asked the crowd “are you tired yet?” when beginning her adress at CPAC. When cries of “NO” responded, she said, “I’m not either”. Little did the attendees know however, that further implications may have been present in the statement. Watch her speech which contained other alluding to comebacks and bouncebacks…

Via Roll Call:

In preparation for a bid, Love has hired former state GOP Chairman Dave Hansen, who was widely heralded last year for successfully managing the re-election campaign of Sen. Orrin Hatch.

Love and Hansen sat down with CQ Roll Call for an interview Saturday at the Conservative Political Action Conference, where she was scheduled to speak.

“We are looking at it very seriously,” Love said. “We are trying to get people engaged and going, and let them know that we have to start early so that we are not starting from behind.”

Love is reaching out to donors now, some 20 months before the election, and putting in place a campaign team far earlier than last cycle. Love didn’t formally enter the wide, 4th District Republican field until January 2012. She shocked Republicans by emerging from the April state party convention with the nomination in hand.

“Getting that message out takes a lot of effort, a lot of funds, so we want to make sure that we are defining ourselves before the opposition does,” Love said.

As the nominee, Love quickly gained national attention – including a coveted speaking slot at the Republican National Convention – for her unique background and potential to become the first black Republican woman in Congress. That looked to be a strong possibility in Utah’s redrawn and Republican-leaning 4th district, much of which was new to Matheson.

While Love held Matheson to under 50 percent, she underperformed compared to Mitt Romney, who was wildly popular in Utah, by nearly 20 points on the ticket. Some Republican strategists criticized her ads and poorly run campaign, while Matheson credited his established brand and own strong campaign team.

With Hansen on board, Love believes she has now assembled the best possible team.

Shock 2016 poll: Hillary would win Texas

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 46%
  • Marco Rubio (R) 45%
  • Not sure 8%
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 45%
  • Chris Christie (R) 43%
  • Not sure 12%
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 50%
  • Rick Perry (R) 42%
  • Not sure 8%
Among Men
  • Marco Rubio (R) 51%
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 40%
  • Not sure 8%
  • Chris Christie (R) 48%
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 41%
  • Not sure 12%
  • Rick Perry (R) 47%
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 45%
  • Not sure 8%

Among Women

  • Hillary Clinton (D) 51%
  • Marco Rubio (R) 41%
  • Not sure 9%
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 48%
  • Chris Christie (R) 40%
  • Not sure 13%
  • Hillary Clinton (D) 54%
  • Rick Perry (R) 38%
  • Not sure 7%

Survey of 500 Texas voters was conducted January 24-27, 2013. The margin of error is +/- 4.4 percentage points. Party ID: 43% Republican; 32% Democrat; 25% Independent/Other.  Political ideology: 30% Moderate; 25% Very conservative; 22% Somewhat conservative; 15%Somewhat liberal; 8% Very liberal.

-Data compilation and analysis courtesy of The Argo Journal

Past Election Logic Favors Romney Winning Popular Vote

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Jim Geraghty says:
Barring Some Sudden Change, Romney Will Win the Popular Vote

Barring some dramatic change in the final ten days or so, Mitt Romney will win the popular vote in the 2012 presidential election.

In the 22 national head-to-head polls with Romney conducted in the month of October, Obama has hit 50 percent once, 49 percent four times, 48 percent three times, 47 percent eight times, 46 percent once, and 45 percent five times. (He hasn’t hit 48 percent in a national poll since October 20.) Mind you, in most of these polls Obama has trailed narrowly, with Romney at 48 to 50 percent, and in a few, he’s led Romney, with the GOP challenger at 45 percent or so. But the polling this month points to a strikingly consistent percentage of support for an incumbent president.

Not only is Obama’s percentage in the RealClearPolitics average 47 percent, he’s at 47 percent in four tracking polls: Rasmussen, ABC News/Washington Post, Gallup, and IBD/TIPP. It is not merely significant that Obama is likely at 47 percent at this moment, it’s that he’s been around 47 percent for most of the month — with debates, new attack-ad barrages on both sides, etc. He’s around 47 percent in polls with many remaining undecideds and few remaining undecideds.

We can debate whether those remaining undecideds, ranging from 3 to 8 percent in most of these polls, will break heavily for the challenger. In 2004, George W. Bush and John Kerry split the remaining undecideds roughly evenly. But the one scenario that political scientists deem virtually impossible is one where undecideds who have declined to support the incumbent all year suddenly break heavily in favor of him. For most of the remaining undecideds, the choice is between voting for the challenger and staying home.

VIDEO: Third party candidates Internet debate plagued by technical glitches

To say the debate encountered “some” technical difficulties would be like saying that Apple has sold “some” iPhones. Johnson kept disappearing from the Hangout like a Muggle at Hogwarts who has yet to figure out which end of his wand is the one that makes stuff vanish. If ever there was a case to be made for blanketing the nation in high speed internet, Gary Johnson made it last night.

Jill Stein promptly became confused by the function of the mute button, and whilst it was obvious that she is passionate about her positions, it was obvious in a 1920’s silent film way. If she doesn’t win the presidency, Stein can always give Verizon a call and see if they need a new “Can you hear me now” person in their ads.

America is the land of free speech, and this reporter for one applauds the embracing of the “Virtual” concept, as well as the sheer grit and determination of candidates willing to run against tremendous odds for what they believe in. Johnson and Stein gave the voices of the people they represent a chance to be heard in this election season. For that alone they deserve credit.

New Presidential Polls show near-tie with Romney advantage

3 Recent polls show President Obama ahead of Governor Romney:

  1. Democracy Corps: Obama 49%, Romney 46%
  2. RAND: Obama 48%, Romney 46%
  3. IBD/TIPP: Obama 47%, Romney 43%

2 Polls resulted in a Tie:

  1. Public Policy Polling: Obama 48%, Romney 48%
  2. Reuters/Ipsos: Obama 46%, Romney 46%

4 Recent polls show Romney ahead of the President:

  1. Gallup: Romney 51%, Obama 45%
  2. Monmouth/SurveyUSA: Romney 48%, Obama 45%
  3. Politico/George Washington University: Romney 49%, Obama 47%
  4. Rasmussen: Romney 49%, Obama 47%

Latest from the swing states shows Obama with the upper hand:

  1. Colorado: Romney 50%, Obama 46% (Rasmussen)
    ..
  2. Iowa: Obama 48%, Romney 48% (Rasmussen)
    ..
  3. Michigan: Obama 52%, Romney 43% (Angus Reid)
    ..
  4. Ohio: Obama 48%, Romney 48% (Angus Reid)
  5. Ohio: Obama 50%, Romney 45% (CBS News/Quinnipiac)
  6. Ohio: Obama 47%, Romney 47% (Suffolk)
  7. Ohio: Romney 47%, Obama 46% (Pulse Opinion Research)
    ..
  8. Pennsylvania: Obama 50%, Romney 45% (Morning Call/Muhlenberg)
  9. Pennsylvania: Obama 48%, Romney 44% (Pulse Opinion Research)
  10. Pennsylvania: Obama 48%, Romney 45% (Gravis)
  11. Pennsylvania: Obama 52%, Romney 42% (Angus Reid)
    ..
  12. Virginia: Obama 47%, Romney 46% (Pulse Opinion Research)
    ..
  13. Wisconsin: Obama 51%, Romney 46% (Angus Reid)
  14. Wisconsin: Obama 50%, Romney 47% (Pulse Opinion Research)